Viðey Ferry:

All Viðey ferry departures have been suspended until further notice!

Information

Northern Lights

Our most popular northern lights tours:

Northern Lights
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    Search for northern lights on this thrilling winter cruise where we maximise your chances of sightings by ALWAYS sailing, as long as the sea conditions allow! Forecasts change and we know just how important it is to always give it a go!

    Duration
    2:00 Hours
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    This combo unites some of the most popular winter attractions in Iceland - whales and northern lights!

    Duration
    5:00 Hours
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More northern lights tours:

Northern Lights
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    The mesmerising Northern Lights is sight that will not be forgotten. It's simple; nothing says “Icelandic Winter” like the idea of hunting the Aurora Borealis. 

    Duration
    3 hrs.
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    This Northern lights tour takes you out of Reykjavik city to the best places to see Northern lights swirling across the night sky in their fantastic shapes and colours.

    Duration
    4 hrs.
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    Northern Lights Cruise including flexible Aurora Exhibition ticket - the perfect combination.

    Duration
    4:00 Hours
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The auroras are made up of a series of electrically discharged particles from the sun that enter earth's magnetic shield and create a light when mixed with gasses (such as nitrogen and oxygen) in our atmosphere. The particles come a long way through space before being drawn into earth’s polar regions, although it only takes a couple of days to travel the full 150 million kilometres!

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The temperature above the sun surface is millions of degrees Celsius. At this temperature, collisions between gas molecules are frequent and explosive particles enter the earth's atmosphere and collide with gas particles. These collisions emit light that we perceive as the dancing lights above the magnetic poles of the northern and southern hemispheres. They are known as 'Aurora borealis' in the north and 'Aurora australis' in the south.

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