Other Species

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other species of faxaflói bay illustration

On our whale watching tours we often encounter other species than whales. The various seabirds, seals and sharks bring surely added value to our tours.

Aðrar tegundir

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    We are seeing more of these over the last couple of years as the water temperatures rise. They get their name by the way they are moving very close to the water surface (basking in the sun) however they are a plankton feeder and this is where the food is. 

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    Capelin is a cold water species and the most ecologically important fish in Icelandic waters. It links the food web between zooplankton and larger fish or baleen whales. Comprising 40% of a cods diet, for example. The capelin spawning grounds are in the South and Southwest of Iceland. The larvae then drift to North Iceland towards Greenland. 

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    Seals and Sea lions are collectively called Pinnipeds. Harbour or Common Seals are the most abundant in Iceland and are frequently encountered on Akurey (puffin colony). There has been 7 species recorded in Icelandic waters but only two of these species breed here the Harbour or Common Seal and Grey Seal. 

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    There are three types of sandeels found in Icelandic waters Ammodytes tobianus (Lesser Sandeel; Sandsíli), Ammodytes marinus (Lesser Sandeel; Marsíli) and Hyperoplus lanceolatus (Greater Sandeel; Trönusíli).

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    The wolfish is a priced catch to recreational and commercial fishermen alike. They have very strong jaws and teeth to enable them to crush shellfish and echinoderms (sea urchins, starfish, sea cucumbers). Unlike most other fish the Wolffish (usually the males) will guard its eggs until they are hatched. When this is done they will all migrate to other areas around Iceland.

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